There is a new film of JFK right before his assassination that has just surfaced. According to the website JFK.org:

This newly-discovered home movie of the fateful Kennedy motorcade was recently donated to The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza. The photographer, George Jefferies, filmed President and Mrs. Kennedy on Main Street at Lamar in downtown Dallas less than 90 seconds before the assassination. Secret Service Agent Clint Hill, assigned to protect Jackie Kennedy, can be seen riding on the left rear bumper. The donor, Wayne Graham, is the son-in-law of Mr. Jefferies.

Click here to view the video footage.

On this day…

December 19, 2006

in 1998 President Clinton was impeached.

After nearly 14 hours of debate, the House of Representatives approves two articles of impeachment against President Bill Clinton, charging him with lying under oath to a federal grand jury and obstructing justice. Clinton, the second president in American history to be impeached, vowed to finish his term.

In November 1995, Clinton began an affair with Monica Lewinsky, a 21-year-old unpaid intern. Over the course of a year and a half, the president and Lewinsky had nearly a dozen sexual encounters in the White House. In April 1996, Lewinsky was transferred to the Pentagon. That summer, she first confided in Pentagon co-worker Linda Tripp about her sexual relationship with the president. In 1997, with the relationship over, Tripp began secretly to record conversations with Lewinsky, in which Lewinsky gave Tripp details about the affair.

For more info on this and other things that happened on this date, visit Today in history

After more than 160 years, the twin masts of the Milan still stand erect _ all the more remarkable because the commercial sailing ship sits in the dark depths of Lake Ontario. “It almost looks like it could be floated” to the surface, said shipwreck explorer Dan Scoville on Monday.

Scoville and fellow explorer Jim Kennard located the schooner in the summer of 2005 off the southern shore of the lake. They videotaped the 93-foot-long, square-stern vessel this year using an unmanned submersible built with the help of college students.

The ship sits upright on the lake bed at a depth of more than 200 feet. Its masts extend 70 feet upward in the dark waters.

“At those depths, and the water being so cold, there’s not a lot of oxygen” Scoville said. “It basically helps preserve the wood. If a shipwreck is in shallow, fresh water, the ice will get it or storms will beat it up.” read more…

I watched a movie tonight on HBO. What originally interested me in this movie was the fact that Michael Pena starred in it. Since his excellent role in Crash, I knew he would be an actor to look out for in more starring roles in the future. The movie I watched tonight was called Walkout. It is the story of a teacher (Pena) mentoring Chicano high school students protesting injustices in the East L.A. public schools in 1968 which led to a series of walkouts. To say the least, the movie was excellent. The first 5 minutes of the film brought up some great points about history.

The 1968 classroom headed by Sal Castro (Pena) questioned where Chicano history was in the textbooks. Almost 40 years later, one must still wonder where it is. Rarely do you read about the Chicano civil rights movement in history texts, the same movement that spread across the country and help raise Chicano college enrollment from 2% to 25% over the few years following the High School walkouts and also helped stop the injustices and help make Chicano schools more equal. Edward James Olmos did this story great justice with his direction and production of this movie allowing millions to see and experience a Civil Rights movement that many never knew existed. I implore anyone who is interested in history, civil rights, and more importantly, human rights, to watch this movie.

On November 21 in History

November 21, 2005

* 235 – Anterus is elected Pope.
* 1272 – Following Henry III of England’s death on November 16, his son Prince Edward becomes King of England.
* 1783 – In Paris, Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier and François Laurent, Marquis d’Arlandes, make the first untethered hot air balloon flight.
* 1789 – North Carolina ratifies the United States Constitution and is admitted as the 12th U.S. state.
* 1791 – Colonel Napoléon Bonaparte is promoted to full general and appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Armies of the French Republic.
* 1861 – American Civil War: Confederate President Jefferson Davis appoints Judah Benjamin secretary of war.
* 1877 – Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record sound.
* 1920 – Bloody Sunday during the Anglo-Irish War Read the rest of this entry »

Yes students, there really were 8 previous leaders of the US before Washington ever took the oath.

The following is taken from The Illuminoids, by Neal Wilgus, published by Pocket Books, New York 1978. It is a history of belief in a secret society called the Illuminati that controls world events behind the scenes. (pp. 31-33)

 

Or was Washington really the first president after all? A number of historians hold that a patriot named John Hanson was technically the first chief executive because he was elected President of the United States in Congress Assembled on November 5, 1781, the first of seven such one-year termed presidents. In fact, Hanson even introduced the victorious General Washington to Congress a few weeks later when the Revolutionary War ended. Read the rest of this entry »

Today in History

September 19, 2005

  • 1356 – English defeat French at Battle of Poitiers
  • 1796 – George Washington’s farewell address as president
  • 1812 – Napoleon’s retreat from Russia begins
  • 1848 – Bond (US) & Lassell (England) independently discover Hyperion
  • 1849 – 1st commercial laundry established in Oakland California
  • 1863 – Battle of Chickamauga Tenn; Union forces retreat
  • 1873 – Black Friday: Jay Cooke & Co fails causing a securities panic
  • 1881 – Pres Garfield dies of gunshot wound
  • 1966 – Mike Burke named Yankees president
  • 1968 – Baby born on Golden Gate Bridge (those Marin County folk!)
  • 1970 – Mary Tyler Moore show premiers
  • 1982 – Streetcars stop running on Market St after 122 years of service
  • 1983 – St Christopher-Nevis gains independence from Britain (Nat’l Day)
  • 1986 – Captain EO permieres
  • War, What is it Good For?

    September 13, 2005

    Absolutely nothing. Here are some war facts.

    • The shortest war on record, between Britain and Zanzibar in 1896, lasted just 38 minutes.
    • Bock’s Car was the name of the B-29 Bomber that dropped the Atom Bomb on Nagasaki.
    • During the US Civil war, 200,000 blacks served in the Union Army; 38,000 gave their lives; 22 won the Medal of Honor.
    • In the Holocaust between 5.1 and 6 million of Europe’s 10 million Jews were killed. An additional 6 million ‘unwanted’ people were also executed, including more than half of Poland’s educated populace.
    • More than 20,000 men were killed, wounded, or missing in action in the battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862. This was the bloodiest one-day fight during the Civil War.
    • On August sixth, 1945, during World War Two, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, killing an estimated 140,000 people in the first use of a nuclear weapon in warfare.
    • The Hundred Year War actually lasted 116 years (1337 to 1453).
    • The total number of Americans killed in the Civil War is greater than the combined total of Americans killed in all other wars.
    • The very first bomb dropped by the Allies on Berlin during World War II killed the only elephant in the Berlin Zoo.

    Presidential Facts

    September 12, 2005

    • In 1965, Congress authorized the Secret Service to protect former presidents and their spouses for their lifetime, unless they decline the protection. Recently, Congress limited the protection of former presidents and their spouses (elected after January 1, 1997) to 10 years after leaving office. President Clinton, who was elected in 1996, will be the last president to receive lifelong protection from the Secret Service.
    • Former President Cleveland defeated incumbent Benjamin Harrison in 1892, becoming the first (and, to date, only) chief executive to win non-consecutive terms to the White House.
    • President George Washington created the Order of the Purple Heart in 1782. It’s a decoration to recognize merit in enlisted men and non-commissioned officers.
    • President Lincoln proclaimed the first national Thanksgiving Day in 1863.
    • Richard Nixon was the 1st US president to visit China in February, 1972.
    • Seven of the eight US Presidents who have died in office – either through illness or assassination – were elected at precisely 20-year intervals.
    • The first losing candidate in a US presidential election was Thomas Jefferson. He lost to John Adams. George Washington had been unopposed.